How the World Impacts Your Craft as a Writer {Every Writer is Different}

Every writer is different. It's a line that's been in the title of every post in this series so far. We've talked about really accessing your unique thoughts and feelings and putting yourself and your joy first as a writer. We've also talked about finding your unique style and process, because how we work differs from writer to writer. However, while these posts are about accessing your abilities as your amazing and unique self, I have yet to address this concept that every writer is different in detail. Hence today's post! Today is going to be a little less tip-filled, but is still just as important. I mentioned the concept slightly in the last post: that as you grow and change, your writing will as well. If you want to be able to consistently keep up your amazing writing abilities, this is definitely some good information to know.

How to Find Your Unique Writing Process {Every Writer is Different}

If you've been around my blog for a while, you'll know that last year I struggled with my own writing process. I finally realized the missing piece in it was joy. I've now made that a top priority in my writing, and in this series, I made it the subject of the first couple posts as well. As I worked my way through experimental manuscripts, testing to see what worked for me, I kept off-handedly promising writers that I would eventually do a post all of its own on the writing process. And, finally... here it is. This has been a year in coming.

Why You Need to Follow Your Heart as a Writer {Every Writer is Different}

I have made fun of the idea of being a Disney princess and following your heart before. However, there is actually some merit to the idea. I mean, if so many of those girls could end up happily ever after, there's got to be something to the idea. Today, I'm breaking down this concept with writing in mind. I mean, it's good and all to listen to your heart when it comes to life choices - that's probably how you decided to become a writer in the first place. But how can you use that idea in your writing itself?

Why You Need to Focus on Joy in Your Writing {Every Writer is Different} {Case Study}

If you've been hanging around my blog for any amount of time, you've probably heard me talking about the idea of finding joy. In your life, in your writing... and in your process. However, while I've written a full post on finding joy in your life, I have only ever dedicated small sections of posts to talking about why you need to find joy in your writing itself. I thought it was high time to address exactly why you need it in your writing, how it actually helps your writing process, and how to utilize it.

Finding Your Why {Every Writer is Different}

Have you ever stumbled upon a part of a book, blog post, podcast, or video where the person who created it is talking about your Why? And... had absolutely no idea what they were talking about? 😅 Or, have you ever heard about it and understood what it was, but been unsure as to how to even go about finding your Why? Join the club. 😆 However, over time, I've found a couple of sure-fire ways to help you find that. So today, I'll be explaining what your Why is, why you need it (see what I did there?) (okay I'll be quiet now), and how to find it.

Why You Shouldn’t Actually Listen to Writing Blogs (But Also Should)

The further along you get on your writing journey, the more knowledge and experience you gather. And along with that comes your own unique perspective, lessons, knowledge, and needs. What one writer needs to do during the writing process id different from another. Which means as you go along with your writing, you actually become above the idea of 'rules'. You can end, break, and completely throw them out as you please. Which is why you really shouldn't even be reading this blog. But don't go unsubscribe! Because, at the same time, you should be reading this blog. Let me explain.

The Benefits of Rereading Your Own Writing

For the longest time, I didn't make it a habit to reread my own writing. I stayed away from rereading it, honestly. It was like my rule of never editing while writing (a myth I've debunked in recent months - check that post out here!): I never so much as considered breaking it. Until I did by accident. And it turns out... there are a lot of benefits to rereading your own writing. (Shocker, I know) Let's take a look at what I discovered.

Putting on Blinders and Blocking out the World

Ever since I started this blog, I've touched on this subject a bit. Who is the first draft for? You. What makes you a writer? Writing. But then, last year, right before summer, something happened to me that really challenged me being able to achieve either of those things. And I think it's high time that I put out a post on the subject. This blog is about my journey as a writer, and I've talked a lot on tough subjects based on what I've gone through before. Buckle up. I'm here to talk today about what happens to a writer when the world creeps in on them and then completely stifles their creative process. aka: the reason I went for so long without writing my own original story ideas.