Being Bold as A Writer: Why You Need to Always Try New Things

Firstly, happy Easter! I hope you had a beautiful and blessed Easter; mine was full of family, friends, and food – the three f’s of life. ๐Ÿ˜œ


Working outside the box, ignoring the norm, and challenging my comfort zone is what I do. It’s what I encourage you to do, as well.

Today, I want to chat a little about the last one – challenging my comfort zone – when it comes to writing, as well as the idea of experimenting with your writing.

I have written a lot of manuscripts over the years. I’ve tackled high fantasy, urban fantasy, sci-fi, and contemporary. In doing so, I’ve written a plethora of characters and plots with different moods and messages.

When I first started writing, I was very plot-centric; I was a pantser, and just did what I wanted that I thought would be cool. I levelled up to having at least an idea of what the end would be before turning to the dark side and becoming a hard-core planner.

Source

I’m now currently sitting at a mid-way: planning, but not overly so. ๐Ÿ‘Œ

I have tried writing books with and without character arcs, with and without messages, plot-driven, character-driven, lots of POV characters, only one POV character, stories with chapters, stories without chapters, first-person, and third-person. I’ve spent months on research before, and also researched on the fly. I’ve been intensely inspired by material from a someone else’s story, not at all, and only loosely.

Basically, I’ve done a lot of different things. ๐Ÿ˜†

The thing is, the more you do, the more you know; the more you know, the more you are able to challenge the ‘rules’ of writing; and the more you challenge, the more you discover what you like to write, what you’re good at writing, and what you want to learn more about when it comes to writing. You ultimately grow as a writer, which means you will constantly be levelling up, changing, and evolving – becoming more you.

Source

When I wrote character arcs, I found out how much I love writing the Midpoint of my story, as well as the Dark Moment + 3rd Plot Point, and Climax. Those are all must-have moments for me. By writing plot-driven stories, I discovered how much I love being dramatic in my writing. And in my high-fantasy story, I found out how much I love sass, which is now a staple in my writing. ๐Ÿ˜†

Source

My point here is pretty obvious, I think. I like writing long posts and deep-diving into topics and really explaining things. But today, let’s keep it simple:

  • Try new things.
  • It will challenge you and make you a better writer.
  • And the more things you find out you like (and become must-haves in your manuscripts), the more you develop your own style of writing, as well.

Now go out and be awesome.

Don’t forget to save this post for later!

Never settle in your writing; I like to push myself to always try to do at least one new thing in my stories. This pushes me to grow as a writer, and I think that’s super important. Things I don’t expect I’ll like I sometimes end up liking, so really, just keep and open mind to trying new things. ๐Ÿ˜Š


What I’ve Learned from Writing 1 Million Words

7 Actionable Tips on Finding Your Unique Writing Style {Every Writer is Different}

7 Tips on How to Name Your Character


I love my deep-dive posts, but I also want to write some more short-and-sweet type posts as well. If you want to see more of those, make sure to subscribe!

If this post helped you in some way, maybe consider buying me a Kofi (or chocolate croissant ๐Ÿ˜œ)! It helps support me and my blog, and will help me to build to even bigger and better things in the future. ๐Ÿ˜Š

Have a great day, my friend; write on.

Do you like to try new things in your writing?

What different kinds of things have you written?

Do you have any must-have elements for all your manuscripts?

-Julia

Photo by Briona Baker on Unsplash

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.